Dear Summer…

Another summer is nearing its end in the South.  And while the thermostats still read in the 90s during the day, you can feel it beginning to cool faster in the evening.  A breath of relief as the wind blows past, and the fabric of clothing starts to unstick from the skin.  The heat has been insurmountable this summer, seeping and expanding into every facet of life.  From the devastation of the senseless murders of Philando Castille, Alton Sterling, and the Dallas police, to the smoldering election campaign as the nation finds itself divided between parties and candidates, to the insatiable appetite for summer love and lust that humans seek along beaches, pool parties, and cook outs.

Finding a way to touch the human spirit with images representing what few words could contain, the ZuCot Gallery in Castleberry Hills has put on an amazing exhibit titled, “Dear Summer…” which brought in artists whose works were meant to speak on, reflect in remembrance, and encompass what this summer has said, done, and where to go from here.

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The Benefits of Giving

Twice in my life I can recall going through serious bouts of depression.  One was between the ages of 13 – 17.  My father calls it The Dark Ages, or in layman’s terms: Puberty.  The other was when I was living in Tennessee and within the same year I lost my first great love to another person, and my best friend to heart failure.

There was nothing to help me through puberty but time and some very patient parental units.  In Tennessee I had an awakening.  After spending months under my bed with a never ending bottle of E & J (please don’t judge) I finally saw glints of light coming through the blinds.  I realized the world was still spinning, with life and love continuing to grow, and that no one could help me as long as I continued to live as a hermit.

However, since I didn’t know how to ask for help, let alone how to accept help, I thought I could help someone else.  I recalled in high school going to Trinity Methodist, across from City Hall in downtown Atlanta, where once a month I prepared and served dinner to homeless men, often whom were struggling with addictions.  And I remembered always being happiest when I was serving others.  These men were inspiring and made me want to be a better person.

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